NICK’S PICKS, THURSDAY, JUNE 23RD AT COLONIAL DOWNS

ALLEN ALL IN

I had the story prepared on this tip sheet.  The story about how trainer Ferris Allen was experiencing a slow start to this year’s meet with only four wins in the first two weeks of the meet.  Click “Send”, and it’s on yesterday’s tip sheet.  Wouldn’t that one have made the Allen stable bulletin board.  I decided to give it one more week.  Another reason to think before you click.
Yesterday’s four win tally by Allen may have been one of his more satisfying days he’s ever had at Colonial.  He’s won 4 races on a Colonial card before and for moments had a personal best in the finale before a rightful disqualification denied a fifth win.
“We had a number of bad trips and had to adjust where we had some horses,” said Allen about the first two weeks of the meet.  “It goes to show you that this game isn’t easy.  You have to earn every one.  There is always someone ready to beat you.”
In one night, Allen doubled his win total for the meet and rocketed back to his familiar perch on top of the trainer standings at Colonial.  It might be fitting that the horse that lauched his 4-win blitz, a $56.80 winner named No Satis Action, was the last horse he owned with his father, Bert Allen, who passed away this winter.  Until last summer, the elder Allen who lived in Varina, could count the days he missed at Colonial on one hand.  Latika, Black Tie Only, N.Y. Stylin were Allen’s other winners all riden by jockey Eric Camacho.
QUOTE OF THE DAY
“When you call upon a Thoroughbred, he gives you all the speed, strength of heart and sinew in him. When you call on a jackass, he kicks.” -Patricia Neal, actress
RACING OF YORE VIRGINIA
Some of the darker days in Virginia’s racing history occurred a hundred years ago when Governor William Hodges Mann led a purge to “prohibit all forms of racetrack gambling.”  The Jamestown Jockey Club held spring and fall races in Norfolk during the era when Mann communicated with Circuit Court Judge J. T. Lawless and Attorney General R. C. Marshall (these are really their actual names) to use diligence to enforce anti-gambling laws.  Mann was concerned about the influx of New Yorkers after that state abandoned racing.  According to the New York Times, Mann did not have a lot of success in the spring of 1911 and later expressed “abominable outrage”  when no counsel for the state showed up at a hearing in October of 1911 to revoke the charter of the Jamestown Jockey Club.   He would eventually succeed leaving Virginia without legal pari-mutuel horse racing until legislation was approved by referendum in 1988.
MAKING RACING HAPPEN…
 …is Larry Foutenot, an outrider on the racetrack.  The Louisiana native gathers loose horses on the racetracks, helps the riders with their mounts and acts like “police on the racetrack.” Larry like to fish when he’s in Louisiana and is searching for fishing holes in Virginia that don’t have waterskiers and innertubers on them.  When not eating fish, he likes the Aberdeen House in Williamsburg for their prime rib.  He is one of three outriders alongside Tim Mayo and Rod Buchacevich.

KNICKERING NICK’S
EXOTIC PLAY OF THE DAY
$2 DAILY DOUBLE
4 with 1,5,6,7
COST $8